The Discipline in The Discipline

Discipline is an interesting word. It describes a specialization within a field of practice. Think of doctors. Each of them specializes in specific conditions and treatments. Yes, they have to go through understanding pathophysiology or how diseases affect the natural functions of the human body. However, specializations allow them to understand specific functions related to…

Discipline is an interesting word. It describes a specialization within a field of practice. Think of doctors. Each of them specializes in specific conditions and treatments. Yes, they have to go through understanding pathophysiology or how diseases affect the natural functions of the human body. However, specializations allow them to understand specific functions related to specific parts of the body.

Discipline also describes training, activity, or exercise to develop and improve a skill. Think about martial artists, soldiers, and athletes. Think about all the time they spend, not fighting, not in war, or competitiveness, but training hard to become better and master their abilities. It is sacred and hard work. Despite the time and skills that took them there, they need to continue working to maintain what they know and can do. They also add to their knowledge as they exercise.

Then you have the discipline in the discipline. In every field of practice and every specialization within a field people have to continue working, practicing, sacrificing time, exercising, studying, and giving their all to maintain and improve the skills and abilities. When they thought they reached their degree or maximum capacity of their skills it is just the beginning. There is always something new to learn, there is always something that could have improved.

Art is no different. There are artists. There are artists who specialize in specific areas of expression. Yes, we learn what we can in a generalize way, and we may master a few disciplines within the arts, but we can not forget that the discipline in the discipline makes us better. This discipline entitles from revisiting basic skills to complicated techniques. Although, “complicated” techniques is just the sum of basic skills put together (but that is a subject that could have been explored in the near future).

As aforementioned, discipline requires to practice certain activities. How does this look like an artist? What exercises help artists get better at what they do? I would like to mention a few from my personal experience. Feel free to share some of your own. These are in no specific order and they do not happen altogether in one day.

  • Prayer, meditation, and Bible reading
  • Reading books and watching documentaries: art, history, archeology, anthropology, and psychology
  • Studio time (A lot can happen there)
  • Drawing and doodling (just for the fun of it)
  • Talking about art and ideas for future work
  • Listening to people: sometimes their stories inspire me
  • Revisiting previous work. This helps me see where I need to practice more.
  • Teaching. By teaching others basic skills I remember to approach art with fresh eyes
  • Studying the figure: yoga, dancers, acrobats …
  • Disconnecting from art: It might sound awkward but sometimes I have to disconnect to reconnect.

I could go on and on, but it would be great to hear about your practices.

The Crisp Way to Crack Even the Cryptic Lot

Since time immemorial, mankind has always evolved towards easing our way to make a living. We evolved from the apes that were quadruped to walking on two legs. Our brains evolved to discover fire, we learn to build houses, rear cattle and we learnt to 'express'. Well, the prime thing that makes us stand out…

Since time immemorial, mankind has always evolved towards easing our way to make a living. We evolved from the apes that were quadruped to walking on two legs. Our brains evolved to discover fire, we learn to build houses, rear cattle and we learnt to 'express'. Well, the prime thing that makes us stand out as a superior specie is – Communication. And as we know, the first form of expressive language is Pictography – a form of writing which uses representational and pictorial drawings. And this tiny bit of info back from your History textbooks is going to impact your business.

Wondering how? Okay, now a tinge of Science before you get it all. Our brain is so bleeped up that it keeps bluffing us almost every time. It always tries to seek the easiest way out and it is so lazy that it wants to process only as little input as possible. Did you know? The brain can process even the most complex and cryptic information if planned as graphics than the same data presented as text. It does the least work while processing visual information and half of our brain is involved in visual processing. Which pretty much clearly explains why we are deceived to look at posters and ads that have more graphics than text. Getting the lead?

Now is the time for our protagonist to take the main stage – Infographics. It is quite obvious that people respond much better to visual marketing, the one reason that infographics have become the game variables of online marketing. They allow you to present information in a way that your prospects will actually absorb your message, instead of just skimming through chunks of text and only retaining a very small percentage of the information. Remember how lazy is our brain? And, definitely for marketers, visual illustration steers more traffic and rendezvous than plain text does. Simply because, 40% of people respond better to visual info than plain text.

It has been found that an infographic is 30 times more likely to be read than a text article. The success of infographics marketing against all other strategies can be firstly credited to our crazy brain. Next, to its structured and organized visual style that conveys a lot of information in a lot less space than writing loaves of text that runs to pages.

If all that you read now has not sparked you into considering infographics marketing for your business, then here's why you should:

  • Infographics marketing generates maximum leads than conventional marketing strategies.
  • Marketing cost is 62% less than other approaches.
  • 60% of buyers consider a product after reading its content.
  • They are extremely engaging and are the future of marketing.

So here's to all of you looking for a crisp and catchy way to skyrocket your business. Go arty. Go infographics.

Is It Worth Trying 3D Rendering Tutorials Online?

Many people are interested to learn 3D rendering, only to be totally discouraged by the number of buttons and functions they have to contend with. However, there is a way that you can understand and learn the basics of 3D rendering and get over the initial shock upon seeing those buttons. You can learn how…

Many people are interested to learn 3D rendering, only to be totally discouraged by the number of buttons and functions they have to contend with. However, there is a way that you can understand and learn the basics of 3D rendering and get over the initial shock upon seeing those buttons. You can learn how to create 3D renders through tutorials online. Here are the reasons why 3D rendering online tutorials are worth your time:

It gives you a basic understanding of 3D rendering

For many people, 3D rendering is mystifying and probably utterly difficult, but the truth is, it is not that difficult or mysterious. Online 3D rendering tutorials will give you a basic idea of ​​the concepts about 3D rendering and you will realize that you can become a 3D rendering professional, too. These tutorials will allow you to learn the basic skills required to create 3D renders. A popular tutorial website is Lynda.com.

It's a good way to spend time

Most people are looking for a hobby-an enjoyable activity to spend their free time on. Some learn new languages ​​while others study a new sport. If you like staying in front of your computer and tinker with software, then 3D rendering will be a good hobby for you. Not only will you enjoy discovery and creativity, you may also soon be good enough to make money off your 3D rendering skills.

3D rendering tutorials are free

If you worry about spending a lot of money on learning 3D rendering, then you should worry no more. You can choose from many free online tutorials. Some of them only cater to beginners but there are a lot of websites that provide tutorial up to the advanced level. All you have to do is download the software they recommend and start learning. Sites that offer free tutorials are Blender.org and Sketchupartists.org.

There are lots of industries where you can use your 3D rendering skills

3D rendering is used by many industries today because it lets them experiment with new designs and present concepts prior to creation or production. Mobile phone makers, architecture and construction, car industry, graphics industry, animation industry, and advertising are just a few of the industries that hire 3D rendering artists. If you have a knack for design, then learning the skills to become a professional 3D rendering professional will help you earn from it in the future.

The Art of Paper Sculptor

Kids have been fond of flying kites and of creating paper planes. Simple and innocent – these paper planes can be very easy to make. A basic origami, a simple draft fold, or some cutting, bending, more appealing folding and painting-these are all the elements of a draft sculptor. Just when you think it is…

Kids have been fond of flying kites and of creating paper planes. Simple and innocent – these paper planes can be very easy to make. A basic origami, a simple draft fold, or some cutting, bending, more appealing folding and painting-these are all the elements of a draft sculptor. Just when you think it is just paper and folding, lo and behold, the next thing you will see is an impressive paper art.

This is the art of manipulation of form with the goal of forming a 3D image or structure. An artist can use various techniques-curving, folding, shaping, or cutting. If he has the skills in origami, this can also be used in letter sculpture. Other artists also use embossing and other methods. The most beautiful solitation paintings are those which are bold and neat as this art places high regard on accuracy of details. Another technique can also be incorporated, which is paper mache. This can be used for larger projects, wherein a card is used instead of the ordinary paper. This is most especially helpful for projects as they grow larger in size. Other tools, such as wire and wood, can also be used to support the card or letter when needed.

Why paper?

It is one of the most ordinary things in our daily lives, but creating something beautiful out of it is exceptional. You may have seen hundreds of drawings in your lifetime, made your own sketches in your spare suit, but paper sculptor is exceptionally different because you create something out of just papers.

Basically, a draft sculptor is an artwork that is created by combining or shapifying various types of form and it needs precision and skills. Paper sculptures are made of several pieces of paper unlike origami which only uses one. This art mainly focuses on the cardboard itself and other elements are just tools.

Styles, Tools and Materials for Paper Sculpture

There are various styles of papery sculpture. It can range from realistic models of buildings, to 3D scenes and abstract art exhibits. What is unique with paper is that is a versatile material that allows the artist to apply his own techniques and create his own style. One of the most needed skill is cutting and this will allow the artist to create styles that are complex.

Basically, the tools and materials that are needed in paper sculpture have no restrictions. The artist is free to use anything he can see, as long as he thinks that these materials can add more aesthetic appeal and quality to his craft. An artist does not need a big investment on materials. The only secret tool in paper sculpture is creativity. A creative mind will take you a long way.

The art of letter sculpture requires preciseness and patience. Every artist knows this-from ensuring his working area is clean, his hands are free of dirt, and the use of minimal glue-every paper sculpture project should be treated carefully.

The Field of Medical Illustration

In a nutshell, medical illustration is a form of biological illustration that is used to record and dissinate medical, anatomical, and other related knowledge. It is unique applied art discipline that is created by professional medical illustrators and animators. It belongs to a larger field of biomedical communication. A medical illustration is a visual representation…

In a nutshell, medical illustration is a form of biological illustration that is used to record and dissinate medical, anatomical, and other related knowledge. It is unique applied art discipline that is created by professional medical illustrators and animators. It belongs to a larger field of biomedical communication.

A medical illustration is a visual representation which is transmitted from the art skills conveyed through a virtual or tangible medium. This shows medical or biological information. This aims to clarify and explain a key feature of scientific illustration that makes it different from science-inspired fine art.

It is known to be a specialist profession that supports other healthcare professions within a science environment. It also requires a certain level of expertise in photography, medical art, videography, or graphic design. These skills are used to produce resource materials such as photographs and other images that can be used to improve science education and patient care.

Where is Medical Illustration mostly used?
An accurate is highly in demand in various medical fields so that they appear in all media and markets to effectively dissolve information on health and medicine. Traditional surgical arts. involves creating sculptured anatomical teaching models, museum exhibits, and mod3els for simulated medical procedures. People are also now leveraging on technology in creating multimedia and interactive designs for their medical illustration. Some even use animation.

illustration can be commonly seen in the following materials:

• Trade and consumer publications
• Textbooks, journals, eBooks
• Web
• Courtroom exhibits
• Patient education
• Continuing medical education (CME)
• Interactive learning
• Advertising
• Mobile health apps
• Health games
• Trade shows
• Museums
• Veterinary and dental markets
• Television and film
• Augmented and virtual reality simulators

Who can be Medical Illustrators?
This requires critical eye for details to ensure accuracy in terms of design and communication. People who are detail oriented and at the same enjoys exploring and learning science, while continuously being in touch with the arts are the ones who will most thrive in this industry. Artists are being assigned various projects, that, they should be equipped with comprehensive knowledge in art methods and media production so they can cope with the changing needs of the biocommunication industry. The core skills of a good medical artist should be painting, advanced drawing, and sculpture in tangible media. He should also have basic knowledge on techniques in producing graphic or commercial art. His computer graphic skills should be relevant and updated to ensure that he can cope with the effects of technology on bicommunication. Being good in motion media is also a plus.

What makes a good medical illustrator?
A person with a strong foundation in science-biological, medical, or general-can go a long way in this field. This is very much needed so he can better and easily understand the more complex medical information. The involved subjects in the field can be highly technical and can involved those that are unseen and theoretical. A person with adept visualization skill to transform this complex information into two-dimensional or even three-dimensional images that can effectively communicate to various audiences.

Making Leaded Stained Glass Window Patterns

Vector clip art is an easy way to start making your own stained glass pattern. The vector format saves the image as lines which creates simple clip art images. These images are easy to edit and do not become jagged when enlarged. These free vector clip art images allow you to enlarge, color or combine…

Vector clip art is an easy way to start making your own stained glass pattern. The vector format saves the image as lines which creates simple clip art images. These images are easy to edit and do not become jagged when enlarged. These free vector clip art images allow you to enlarge, color or combine images to create your pattern.

Make a new folder in your graphics program and name it “My glass pattern clip art objects” or whatever you will remember. Find the images you are interested in, “right click” on the image or follow the websites directions for downloading their images, and save them into this folder. Select which objects will work for this particular stained glass pattern or start a collection of clip art images for use now and in the future.

  • Clipart-design.com sells professional design packs while providing free download for 500+ vector clip art designs, ornaments, and icons from 35 of those professional packs. Download and import these directly into most graphic programs.
  • Clipart.magicpeople.org offers free vector clip art files free for commercial and personal use. Choose from holidays, wedding, valentine, anime, and more.
  • Digitalclipart.com provides vector clip art, free, for private use only. The free images are not for commercial use. Choose from the sport, mascot, animals, fantasy, tribal, tattoo, transportation, people, ornaments and objects.
  • Free-clip-art.com contains sports, food, religious, wedding, education, medical, holiday, music, transportation and borders vector clip art. These vector clip art images will download in a.zip format. Save the zip file by right clicking on the zipped file icon to open it and save it to the appropriate file on your computer.

There may be times when you see something in a photo that pulls together elements you want use to design a stained glass pattern. You can use photos for design elements or find a very simple photo to trace and use for a stained glass pattern.

  • Publicdomainphotos.com is a website where the photos are free to use for personal or commercial use, public domain simply means that the photographer has released the copyright of the photo so others can use it for their projects. This website includes flowers, food, and landscape photographs entirely over 5,000 photographs to look at for inspiration for a stained glass window pattern.
  • The nice detail about Imagebase.net is that you can search for objects. I found an up close and personal photograph of a key that can easily be traced and made into a stained glass pattern.
  • BurningWell.com is a repository of public domain photographs to be used for personal and commercial use. Texture is a great category on this website for grass, clouds, buildings, and ideas for the ground including rocks.
  • Freephotos and Fontplay offers over 10,000 photographs and font images that can be used for making a stained glass pattern.
  • Photorack.net is a collaboration of free stock photos to use in any creative manner you choose. Water and birds are a common theme in stained glass window art. This duck in the water photo is easy to trace and be made into individual stained glass pieces to form a leaded stained glass window.

Another way to get the image you want for your stained glass pattern is to scan it into your computer. Save all of the images into your folder you made for this pattern so everything you have found, downloaded, copied and scanned is together and ready for you to combine to design your pattern.

To draw your pattern begin by opening up the images you want to combine for your pattern into a photo editing program. Print the image in “grayscale”. Printing in “grayscale” makes the edges of the images more defined and easier to trace.

Tape one image at a time onto a window that has light coming through it and tape a blank sheet of paper over it. Trace the edges of the image shapes with a pencil. Remember, as you trace the shapes, you will be cutting each shape into glass pieces. Depending on your skill level for cutting stained glass the pieces should be made large while keeping the overall image recognizable. You may need to add additional lines so individual pieces can be cut.

Repeat for each image you want to combine for your stained glass pattern.
Scan each pencil drawing onto your computer and into a photo editing program and print out the images. Cut around each image. Use a large piece of white paper or tape several sheets of printing paper together so it is larger than your finished pattern will be. Tape each image into place. With a pencil add lines to connect each image making sure each individual piece can be cut into a stained glass piece.

Draw an outside binding box the exact size you want your stained glass window to be. Connect each image to this box. Remember that all the lines do not have to be straight yet do not make them so curved that they can not be cut into stained glass pieces.

Number each piece of your pattern. Decide which pieces are going to be what color and begin a color code. “Blk” for black, “Y” for yellow, “Gr” for green, “Gry” for gray, etc. Put the color code onto each piece alongside of the number.

On each piece put slash lines depicting which way the grain will go. This will be very important when using stained glass with streaks or textures. You will want to cut each piece of that colored stained glass in the same direction so your pattern flows.

Make three copies of your finished pattern. One will be placed on a flat surface and be used as the template, one will be cut into individual pieces and the third copy will be for stand-by in case you need to re-cut pieces or for reference.

How 3D Art Has Changed the Face of Design

Have you ever tried to explain to someone the concepts behind 3D design and simulation? Well I have and nine times out of ten it's met either with confusion or that look you get of utter bemusement. Then you spend the next couple of hours trying to justify your passion and interest secretly knowing the…

Have you ever tried to explain to someone the concepts behind 3D design and simulation? Well I have and nine times out of ten it's met either with confusion or that look you get of utter bemusement. Then you spend the next couple of hours trying to justify your passion and interest secretly knowing the person you are talking to is counting sheep in their head.

“3D models represent a 3D object using a collection of points in 3D space, connected by various geometric entities such as triangles, lines, curved surfaces, etc.” This is a definition taken from Wikipedia and to be honest with descriptions like this chaptering a search on Google, I'm not surprised there is an element of confusion in the industry.

Where it all began?

I began my computing life using a Commodore 64 back in the 80's, I will not go into detail about my age as this is a secret I often lie to myself about. There are many of us that will remember the typical blue screen and the need for patience as the system often got itself into a pickle when trying to start-up. Alas, when you finally got there you were giggling inside not only as a precursor to the coming hours of gaming frenzy, but that it was your turn and your brother (or sister sister) could not get it to work. Paper Boy was my game of choice, yet what stumped me as I continued my adventure into the world of flat 3D pixel art was my ability to forget how difficult it was to control. I spent many time screaming blue murder at the game, blaming those square shaped cars on the road, the mass of pixels for people, but the true pain in my proverbial behind was those irritating drains that got me every time. To this day I still have not completed the first level and I fear I never will.

Inspired to learn more:

3D art has come a long way since the days of Paper Boy and my beloved Commodore 64, not only in gaming but in practical application. I moved from the gaming scene at a young age into more creative ventures, rarely the one we all cherish being Lego. Those stimulating colorful bricks, the simplicity in its design and the abundance of pieces you could use made for hours of creative fun. Looking back I can actually say that Lego was my inspiration for 3D creative design, as I feel it best defines the concept of 3D modeling. You take different blocks and put them together to create an otherwise completely different, albeit often, unrecognizable shape.

I took my curiosity to many different levels experimenting on building space crafts, planes with 10 wings and cars that could defy gravity, but my passion started when I tried to create existing products like a vacuum cleaner and make it better. On a personal level, have you ever tried to create a vacuum cleaner out of Lego, I kept running out of clear bits, oh how simple things were back then.

3D in the real world:

3D went through many years of transition from simple gaming to what we see today, we all know what the Xbox and PlayStation games are like now, they almost immerse you into believing you are in the game. This is what is expected from media in today's climate, people want to be wowed by realism, shocked by the effects and stimulated by the scenes. This is not only true for games but for practical uses of 3D such as interior design, concept art, prototyping and marketing. 3D technology has come a long way in such a small amount of time, where specialized software allows you to create a fully generated 3D replica of whatever you want. However, it's not just that concepts that can be created it has mechanical and structural applications, where the user can simulate a design, such as a bridge or gear system and test it's mechanical of material strengths and failures, allowing them to innovate and invent faster and more efficiently, giving us the opportunity to imagine a 3D world, outside of our own.

Changing the face of design:

I suppose to summarize my endless rant about history in the making and my lack of ability on Paper Boy, I would say that 3D modeling and simulation has changed the face of design and no longer are we limited by our own practicalities, but we can now use our imagination to pave the way for the future. In my opinion to best define 3D design and simulation, you should first understand what you are trying to achieve. In simple terms 3D design is the ability to replicate any physical object into digital art, you can then simulate that model into an animation for visual or practical use. Many would ask why not take a picture and the answer to that is easy. What if you are in a marketing campaign and you need to have visuals on a certain product that is no longer available or is very expensive. Well recreating that product in 3D allows for the marketing shots to be taken from whatever angle, giving you the closest thing to a photo as you can get.

Final thought:

3D is already in our lives in media and marketing, TV and games and soon it will be walking through our homes and defining the limits in which we pose on ourselves. Try to imagine a 3D world and let it change the face of your design and give your creative side a shoulder to lean on when conceptualizing and innovating with the use of 3D modeling and design. If you want to give 3D modeling a go, try Microspot's Interiors Professional for the Mac.

Music for Art – Thinking About the Medium

Composers writing music for art may discover inspiration and direction for their work by considering not only the content of visual art but the art media. Media often has social impacts which arouse definite associations, strong feelings and emotions. When composers tune in to the implications of art media, they afford themselves a wealth of…

Composers writing music for art may discover inspiration and direction for their work by considering not only the content of visual art but the art media. Media often has social impacts which arouse definite associations, strong feelings and emotions. When composers tune in to the implications of art media, they afford themselves a wealth of additional information about the artwork which can be interpreted and expressed musically.

The Fine Art Of Drawing

Drawing is a very complex subject and one that needs to be approached in a delicate fashion. So many people are afraid to even try to pick up a pencil. It appears that topics such as cross-hatching and hatching brings people out in goose bumps. Why should that be? It is a drawing technique which…

Drawing is a very complex subject and one that needs to be approached in a delicate fashion. So many people are afraid to even try to pick up a pencil. It appears that topics such as cross-hatching and hatching brings people out in goose bumps.

Why should that be?

It is a drawing technique which has been used by the old masters years before it's time. It is just a method of using interlocking pencil lines to create darker and lighter areas within your picture. The technique is great fun to use and easy to master. There are many other fun techniques you can use to make a subject really stand out on the page. One such technique is smudging, which is created by using a very soft pencil such as a 6B. The pencil work is rubbed lightly with the finger until it creates a smudged area, then a putty rubber is used to add contrast to the picture. We must not forget plain shading which should never be overlooked. It is important to create shadow around your art work, but you must determine where the light is coming from first. If your subject matter is a still life of fruit, it is possible to determine were the light hits the fruit. Then you shade from the opposite side. This adds depth to your picture and directs the eyes to the subject matter.

We hear a lot about the use of cameras and computers in this day and age and it makes you wonder if there is still a place for drawing in our busy lives today. It is true that you can draw using a computer and can use a camera to produce stunning photographs.

Does this detract from real drawing?

In my mind there is always a place for pure pencil work on good quality paper. The computer can not compete with soft and gentle pencil lines. The detail of hard and soft strokes upon the page are left entirely for artists.

This is also a opportunity to discuss what interests and wonders people about drawings from the past. If we look to the past we can almost touch and taste real drawing. There is a picture of cats by Leonardo da Vinci which I particularly like. It is a comprehensive study of cat postures. It shows his mind developing the concept of the form and structure of a common cat. This pencil picture could never be replaced. It is a master piece of pencil work which is made more appealing since the subject matter is illegally to keep still. Drawing is being pushed to the limits in our life time but still it holds a mystery and mastery element. The joy of producing a clear fresh image of an object can feel exhilarating. The mastery of the basic pencil can make you feel a million dollars.

3D Rendering Versus Photoshop

Most people know about Adobe Photoshop. In fact, it may even be the most popular PC software ever. People use it for a lot of things-making greeting cards, editing their photos, making websites, distorting pictures for funny effect and much more. Photoshop is also commonly used in designing websites and other graphics applications. However, in…

Most people know about Adobe Photoshop. In fact, it may even be the most popular PC software ever. People use it for a lot of things-making greeting cards, editing their photos, making websites, distorting pictures for funny effect and much more. Photoshop is also commonly used in designing websites and other graphics applications. However, in recent years another graphic technology is beginning to make noise – 3D rendering.

Many people study Photoshop and soon get jobs as graphic artists. The same thing is true for 3D rendering. So if you plan to become proficient in a graphic software to make some money from your skills, should you study Photoshop or 3D rendering? This article will help you find an answer to that.

Differences between Photoshop and 3D Rendering Software

Photoshop as we know is a photo editing software on stereoids. It has too much muscle for an editing software and people love it. With Photoshop, people are able to place their rendered photos on different backgrounds, increase their muscle mass and make themselves look beautiful. However, in the end Photoshop is just photo manipulation software so you can not create pictures with it – all it does is just change the picture.

On the other hand, 3D rendering software can manipulate photos and create pictures from nothing. If Photoshop is a photo editor on steroids, 3D rendering software is Photoshop on steroids-that's the difference. 3D rendering is used a lot in construction business and architecture. Architects for example imagine a house design and create that design in a photorealistic fashion on their PC using a 3D rendering software.

Difference in difficulty

Everyone says Photoshop is difficult. The learning curve is quite steep and there are too many buttons and functions to remember. That is true as anyone who has ever tried Photoshop can attest to the fact that it can be frustrating. However, when it comes to 3D rendering, it's double the difficulty. It has more buttons, more functions, and steeper learning curve. So if it's difficult why would anyone use it or learn to use it? The answer lies in profitability.

Profitability differences between Photoshop and 3D rendering

People who are good at using Photoshop make money, there's no denying that. They are in demand specifically on the web, graphic design, and advertising industries. But remember there are already too many Photoshop professionals around so the competition may be very steep.

3D rendering , on the other hand, is an emerging technology. There is currently a great demand for 3D rendering professionals because many industries need them-mobile phone companies, car manufacturers, construction, architecture, landscape designing and many more. 3D rendering is used to create and not just edit physical designs of products. The next concept car you see may have been designed using a 3D rendering software.

If you have talent in design and art and want to learn graphics software, should you study Photoshop or 3D rendering? The answers is up to you, but remember, 3D rendering will be around for a long time.

Handmade Glass Tile Art in Goa

Similar to the history of the British in India, the history of the Portuguese rule in Goa lasted 450 years. During that time, what's even more interesting is that Portugal was ruled by Spain for 60 years starting from the late 16th century. Vasco de Gama, a Portuguese explorer, which some may compare to Christopher…

Similar to the history of the British in India, the history of the Portuguese rule in Goa lasted 450 years. During that time, what's even more interesting is that Portugal was ruled by Spain for 60 years starting from the late 16th century.

Vasco de Gama, a Portuguese explorer, which some may compare to Christopher Columbus, was the first European to have reached India by sea. It was a significant discovery as it extended Portugal's power, enabling the country to establish a long-lasting colonial empire in Asia.

Goa then became the ideal base for the Portuguese, they also took to spreading Christianity, which is why you will notice when visiting Goa, a lot of the population is Christian mixed with Hindu.

You will also notice the influence of Portuguese architecture everywhere. A European flair infused with an Indian style. A beautiful combination.

Ceramic tile art has been around since as early as 4,000 BC. The earliest known examples are from Egyptians, spreading through many cultures and regions thereafter.

Coming to Portugal in the 16th Century, the tiles were improvised with their own unique Touches carrying the prominent color of blue. The handmade glass tile art in Goa we see today is called “Azulejos.”

There are many unique shops that carry various pieces of this tile art as well as other works of art, one in particular from renounced Goan Cartoonist, Mario Miranda.

Known best for his creative talent in presenting Goa on canvasses, his works all portray a somewhat busy cartoon feel, while carrying an immense attention to detail with each character and place drawn.

Our favorite spot for tile art was Velha Galleria, located in the capital of Goa, Panjim. This place carries so many intricate pieces of handmade art, you will not be able to resist purchasing at least one item.

On that strip there are many art galleries that you can wander in to, some carry featured artists of the week, while others, an array of paintings from numerous artisans, Goan and non.

Naturally being in India, jewelry is big there too. And that, handmade as well with gorgeous designs, some that leave you wondering how they made it.

It should also be mentioned that absolutely everyone in Goa is smiling, from the people to even the water buffaloes and stray dogs!

So if you're looking for a relaxing getaway filled with happy people and animals, art, culture and everything handmade, Goa should be on your bucket list of places to visit.

Characteristics and Uses of Liquid Chalk Markers

What are liquid chalk marks? They are a unique and fun way to write on multiple non-porous surfaces like windows, mirrors, glass, plastic, (even, not chalkboard painted surfaces or porous surfaces), whiteboards, LED boards and more. What do they contain? Liquid chalk marks contain a liquid contracting water, resin, and pigment, which writes like a…

What are liquid chalk marks?

They are a unique and fun way to write on multiple non-porous surfaces like windows, mirrors, glass, plastic, (even, not chalkboard painted surfaces or porous surfaces), whiteboards, LED boards and more.

What do they contain?

Liquid chalk marks contain a liquid contracting water, resin, and pigment, which writes like a marker, but when it dries, it looks like chalk. But the best is that it wipes smoother than chalk and there's no dust like chalk.

There are sets of four, six, eight, nine and ten liquid chalk markers that include a variety of bright neon colors: black, brown, red, orange, pink, yellow, green, blue, purple and white.

Characteristics of these fantastic marks

• They are completely dust free so they can be used for allergy and asthma sufferers.

• They can have different size nibs from 2 mm to 15 mm. The nib may be a bullet, chisel or reversible. What does mean a reversible tip? That you can use both chisel or bullet tip in the same design and makes easy to do fine and bold work and offers more options for everyone who use them.

• Each marker contains from 4 to 8 grams of high quality ink that is odor free and non-toxic. They have the US and European certificates conforming to all standards for art products.

• They are washable. Only use a damp cloth and remove colors easily and completely.

• They are child safe for children 3 years or above.

• You can use them for any non-porous surface so you will have endless fun. The only limit is your creativity.

What separates liquid chalk marks from regular chalk?

Regular chalk or dry erase marks can be dull, lackluster, or just plain streaky. Liquid chalk marks have a variety of bright fluorescent marks that distinguish them from any other chalk.

Some sets of 10 colors have characteristics that distinguish them from other liquid chalk marks:

• They have high quality bright ink

• They are charged with 8 grams of ink so they last longer than others do.

• They are designed with premium quality fiber tips that will not distort or dry out prematurely. As long as you follow the basic care instructions.

Finally, you can use these fantastic marks on a variety of projects: kid's projects, brainstorming ideas in your workplace, or your coffee menu or message boards, or creating art at home. I hope you enjoy using your liquid chalk marks.

How to Find the Perfect Corporate Video Production Service

A content-rich, well-produced video can be an excellent tool for selling any product, service, or idea. Well-executed corporate video will impress clients, dazzle business partners, train staff, and educate stockholders. Of course, odds are good that if it does all, the video was produced by a corporate video production service. Choosing a service entitles a…

A content-rich, well-produced video can be an excellent tool for selling any product, service, or idea. Well-executed corporate video will impress clients, dazzle business partners, train staff, and educate stockholders. Of course, odds are good that if it does all, the video was produced by a corporate video production service. Choosing a service entitles a little homework on your part, and it should always include the following measures:

Learn how much experience the service has, and in what areas

These days, most services offer video production and video editing expertise, but are they proficient at creating web videos, training videos and commercial videos? If the answer is not “yes” to all three options, they probably do not have the savvy to help your company reach its full potential. Sooner or later, you'll want to offer quality video products in all three realms, so you need a service that can do that.

Carefully study just what you're getting from a service

When you compare video production and video editing services, the team you absolutely select should offer each or most of the following:

• Superior copywriting from a group that knows how to sell
• Stunning digital design
• Targeted conceptualizing that ensures your company's message reaches viewers
• Professional post-production editing that ensures every detail is exactly correct
• Video compression technology that creates the sharpest, cleanest images
• The capacity to create original music scores

It's also wise to get the best value from your investment. Most good production services offer different packages to fit every company's budget and creative demands. You do not want to pay for a Cecil B. Demille “Ten Commandments” production when you're doing a 30-second spot on the advantage of silicone vs. rubber windshield wiper blades. You just want to entice customers to buy a new set of blades.

Everyone brags about customer service. Go with a service that provides it

Here's a good practice to put into place as you compare services: Determine which one listened to you the best during the initial meeting. This company did not try to fit you into one-size-fits-all package. It did not say, “This is what we recommend to most of our clients.” It did not do anything in the way of a sale upon the first conversation. Instead, its principal said, “Let me see how we can tailor what we have to create what you need. And when they got back to you shortly, they did, indeed, tailor what they have to create what you need.

Listen to the “word on the street” – or on the Internet

One of the better ways to know how well a video service takes care of its customers is to check reviews of how it has taken care of other customers. These days, the Internet is full of “report card” sites, where customers offer honest appraisals of the service they received. A lot of good reviews is a good indicator that you'll be able to give one soon, as well.

10 Logo Design Tips for a Creative Logo

1. Simplicity If you're looking to capture the attention of potential customers and remind current instances of your reach, a busy or cluttered logo is not going to do your business any favors. A complex logo can be difficult to reproduce and more importantly, difficult to remember. The logo does not have to be artistic,…

1. Simplicity

If you're looking to capture the attention of potential customers and remind current instances of your reach, a busy or cluttered logo is not going to do your business any favors. A complex logo can be difficult to reproduce and more importantly, difficult to remember. The logo does not have to be artistic, it can be simple, and give out the message perfectly. So keep it simple.

2. Purpose

It is not always necessary to design a logo about what a company represents or does. For example Restaurant logos do not need to show food, dentist logos do not need to show teeth, furniture store logos do not need to show furniture. Just because it's relevant, does not mean you can not do better. The Mercedes logo is not a car. The Virgin Atlantic logo is not an airplane. The Apple logo is not a computer. Etc.

3. Memorable

Choosing a design that's bold enough to be both memorable and instantly recognizable is one key to success. Following closely on this principle of simplicity is that of memorability. An effective logo design should be memorable, which is achieved by keeping it simple yet appropriate.

4. Versatile

A good logo needs to be versatile in the sense it should look good across a variety of media and applications. For this reason, logos should be designed in vector format, to ensure that they scale to any size. One way to create a versatile logo is to begin designing in black and white. This allows you to focus on the concept and shape, rather than color, which is subject in nature.

5. Mood

Keep in mind the mood of the logo. Choose an appropriate font and a color scheme for intended audience. For instance a child-like font and color scheme would be appropriate for a logo for a children's toy store and not so much for a hospital.

6. Visual double entendre

Visual double entendre is an overly fancy way to say that it has two pictures wrapped into one through clever interpretation of a concept or idea. This technique comes off as clever and memorable. Often customers love the little mind game and appreciate the design because of it.

7. Be unique not a part of crowd

Be creative and use a design that you actually thought of instead of ripping of what everyone else is doing. Try and think out-of-the-box bring mundane objects into the mold of uniqueness.

8. Custom typography

When it comes to logo design, your typeface should be unique. A custom hand-drawn typeface is a better option than most gorgeous fonts anyway. On the subject of being unique, custom lettering gives your logo a unique feel.

9. Consider Proportion & Symmetry

When designing a logo proportion and symmetry should be taken into consideration. The circles are simply used as a guide to create a well balanced logo with consistent curves and arcs.

10. Think About Negative Space

Negative space is, quite simply, the space that surrounds an object in an image. More and more these days, the creative world is seeing an emergence of artists creating positive spaces and shapes that, in turn, cleverly carve out shapes in negative space intentally.

What’s Your Type? The 5-Step Guideline to Finding the Right Font

Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts 1. What is the mood you want to convey? Are you designing a presentation, a website, or a book report? What is the mood you want to convey? Picking a typeface is not unlike choosing an outfit to wear for the day. Just as with clothing,…

Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts

1. What is the mood you want to convey?

Are you designing a presentation, a website, or a book report? What is the mood you want to convey?

Picking a typeface is not unlike choosing an outfit to wear for the day. Just as with clothing, there is a distinction between typefaces that are expressive and stylish versus those that are useful and appropriate to many situations. Is it fun? Casual? Serious? Fresh? Old-fashioned? Choose a typeface that captures that feeling.

Example: if you are creating a logo for a bank, you will want to select a typeface that creates a sense of security and protection. So a formal and a traditional type face like Adobe pro Garamond will be a better choice.

2. Grouping fonts: The font Family

A quick way of organizing possible typeface choices is to use the most widely used typography categorization: serif or sans serif.

They say that serif fonts provide continuity and engagement, and there before improve readability but sans serif supporters call that a typography myth. Generally serif fonts are more traditional and 'old style' while sans serif typefaces are seen as modern and futuristic.

Whether you choose Serif or Sans, there are a plethora of great choices within both categories. To learn more about type classifications, start by looking up commonly used categories like geometric, humanist, old style, modern, transitional and slab serif.

Geometric Sans-Serifs are those type faces that are based on strict geometric forms. The individual letter forms of a Geometric Sans often have strokes that are all the same width and frequently evidence a kind of “less is more” minimalism in their design.

Examples of Geometric / Realist / Grotesk Sans: Helvetica, Univers, Futura, Avant Garde, Akzidenz Grotesk, Franklin Gothic, Gotham.

Humanist

These are sans faces that are derived from handwriting – as clean and modern as some of them may look, they still retain something inescapably human at their root. The letter forms of a Humanist font generally have more detail, less consistency, and frequently involve thinner and thicker stoke weights

Examples of Humanist sans: Gill Sans, Frutiger, Myriad, Optima, Verdana.

Old Style

These typefaces are marked by little contrast between thick and thin, and the curved letter forms tend to tilt to the left (just as calligraphy tilts). Old Style faces at their best are classic, traditional and readable.

Examples of Old Style: Jenson, Bembo, Palatino, and Garamond.

Transitional and modern

The letterforms of transitional and modern are more geometric, sharp and virtuosic than the unassuming faces of the Old Style period. At their best, transitional and modern faces seem strong, stylish and dynamic.

Examples of transitional typefaces: Times New Roman, Baskerville.

Examples of Modern serifs: Bodoni, Didot.

Slab serif

Slab Serif is also called mechanistic, square serif or Egyptian typeface is a type of serif typeface characterized by thick, block-like serifs. Serif terminals may be either blunt and angular (Rockwell), or rounded (Courier).

Examples of Slab Serifs: Clarendon, Rockwell, Courier, Lubalin Graph, Archer.

3. Choosing Serif and Sans serif

The main title of your project could have been written in a bold sans-serif font. It might be a good idea to use a serif font with your body copy. You want to have some contrast to show the difference between the two sections of your project. Combining two or more typefaces can be tricky. The general rule of thumb is to use a neutral serif and san serif combination. It's safe, easy and it works. Set the headline in “Helvetica” and the body copy in “Times New Roman” and you're good to go!

If that's too boring for you, try combining an old typeface with a modern typeface. How about a script with a san serif? If you do this, it's important to pay attention to the contrast between the typefaces you choose. Be sure the contrast between them is great enough to separate them. If the typefaces are too similar, they will look awkward and out of place. Combining “Helvetica” and “Arial”, for example, will look more like a careless mistake than a conscious design choice.

4. A Dash of flavor to the design

Display and decorative typefaces should be used sparingly. A little “Shanghai” font goes a long way. It works on this menu in the logo and category headings. Now, imagine an entire menu set in “Shanghai” font makes it difficult to read. Unless you are not concerned about readability, these typefaces are not a suitable choice for large blocks of text. These fonts applied sparingly to headlines, a display font can add a well-needed dash of flavor to a design, but it can quickly wear out its welcome if used too wide.

These fonts applied sparingly to headlines, a display font can add a well-needed dash of flavor to a design, but it can quickly wear out its welcome if used too wide.

5. Rule Number Five Is 'There Are No Rules'

There are only conventions; no ironclad rules about how to use type, just as there are no rules about how we should dress in the morning. It's worth trying everything just to see what happens. Typography is something you learn over time and requires endless trial and error. Occasionally, it becomes an easy, natural process. In the meantime, have fun!

In Conclusion

I Hope these five principals have given you some guidelines for selecting, applying, mixing typefaces and whether to mix it at all. In the end, picking typefaces requires a combination of understanding, intuition, and skill demands practice.